Messages received from Sermon “Lost in Transition” Tezenlo Thong

“Lost in Transition”

 Messages received from Sermon by Tezenlo Thong

  • We often seek tangible or visible proof to support of our faith.
  • We are actually undergoing transition from the first day of our lives and our transitions are right before us, we are not lost, we are uncertain.
  • Dealing with transition is dealing with:
    • confusion
    • loss
    • anger
    • uncertainty
  • Our strength in transitions is within ourselves as God is with us every step.
  • Through God’s grace we have right before us and within us the strength to deal with transitions with:
    • clarity and simplicity
    • acceptance
    • happiness
    • confidence
Advertisements

Home made parrot food recipe

I have four parrots, a Cockatoo, Red-Bellied, Senegal, and Jardine.

They get a warm breakfast in the morning and parrot kibble in the afternoon.   I rotate kibble and also mix 3 or 4 different types together to keep my parrots from getting too picky.

Please research toxic foods that your birds should not eat such as: chocolate, salt, sugar, avocados, onions, mushrooms and caffeine.

I start with a 15 bean soup mix discarding any flavor packet.  I sometimes use a Bob’s Red Mill soup mix.  Here I add other grains such a brown rice, buckwheat and barley.  Different grains each time. Soak the beans and grains in plenty of water over night or while at work.  Drain off soaking water and add the fruit and veggie mix below to cook, cook well on the stove or in a crockpot.

Fruit and veggie mix:  I put water, veggies and fruit in a blender, a total of 4 or five different things.  Whatever is in season is good.  No fruit seeds such as apples seeds or any pits.  Organic if possible skins are okay if organic.  If I am making dog food the same night I make a huge batch and use half for dog food, half for bird food.  Just remember dogs cannot have grapes but birds can.

(I know many people feed raw fruits and veggies but I mix and cook everything together for convenience.)

The beans need to be cooked long enough to be soft  for your birds to eat them and for them to be nutritious.  If when done cooking your mix is a little wet you can either pour off the extra liquid (wasting nutrients?) or add something like oatmeal to soak extra liquid.  I sometimes also use a small amount of dried fruit such as raisons to soak up some of the liquid. Usually I just cook gently until liquid absorbed. My birds won’t eat if soupy.

Last I add some herbs like a small amount of parsley or some cinnamon or some crushed hot peppers.  Birds can get picky if you don’t switch it up so every time I make it different.

I divide the mix up into containers and freeze, thawing a one or 2 day batch as needed.  They have this in the morning and at lunch time I give the kibble mix.

Heat in microwave but make sure there are no spots, should be just warm.  Here I add a very small amount of  coconut oil or Udi’s 3-6-9 oil blend.

Be creative the more variety the better.  As I mentioned in my dog food recipe, I read once to try to eat 40 different things each day for the best nutrition.

 

 

2014-10-12 Sermon Simpson UMC “Lost in Transition” Tezenlo Thong

“Lost in Transition”

Exodus 32:1-14

The journey of Israelites from Egypt to the Promised Land was a dramatic period of transition from slavery to freedom. It was also a period of transition from certainty to uncertainty.

Where are we going to get water? Where are we going to get our daily bread?

This was also a period of transition in their faith too: from the worship of Yahweh to a worship of a golden calf. The God who led them out of Egypt was not visible or tangible. On the other hand, the gods of the Canaanites were visible, right there in front of your eyes.

Life is a series of transition from one thing to another, and often times we feel lost when we transition from happiness to sadness. There is anxiety when we transition from fulfillment to loss, from celebration to grief. Fear can overcome us when we transition from abundance to scarcity, from success to failure, or from life to death: what am I going to do? How am I going to live?

When we experience loss or a sense of loss in the transition of life, we are tempted to seek security and certainty in a golden calf, a “god” that is tangible. However, we need to be careful not to latch onto a false security that will disappear within no time only to leave us with a sense of emptiness. Aristotle referred to “God” as the “Unmoved Mover” the primary “mover” or force of all the motion in the universe. What would it be like for the mortals to hold on to the Unmoved Mover and find security?

Tezenlo Thong, Pastor
Simpson United Methodist Church

Exodus 32:1-14
32:1 When the people saw that Moses delayed to come down from the mountain, the people gathered around Aaron, and said to him, “Come, make gods for us, who shall go before us; as for this Moses, the man who brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.”

32:2 Aaron said to them, “Take off the gold rings that are on the ears of your wives, your sons, and your daughters, and bring them to me.”

32:3 So all the people took off the gold rings from their ears, and brought them to Aaron.

32:4 He took the gold from them, formed it in a mold, and cast an image of a calf; and they said, “These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!”

32:5 When Aaron saw this, he built an altar before it; and Aaron made proclamation and said, “Tomorrow shall be a festival to the LORD.”

32:6 They rose early the next day, and offered burnt offerings and brought sacrifices of well-being; and the people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to revel.

32:7 The LORD said to Moses, “Go down at once! Your people, whom you brought up out of the land of Egypt, have acted perversely;

32:8 they have been quick to turn aside from the way that I commanded them; they have cast for themselves an image of a calf, and have worshiped it and sacrificed to it, and said, ‘These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!'”

32:9 The LORD said to Moses, “I have seen this people, how stiff-necked they are.

32:10 Now let me alone, so that my wrath may burn hot against them and I may consume them; and of you I will make a great nation.”

32:11 But Moses implored the LORD his God, and said, “O LORD, why does your wrath burn hot against your people, whom you brought out of the land of Egypt with great power and with a mighty hand?

32:12 Why should the Egyptians say, ‘It was with evil intent that he brought them out to kill them in the mountains, and to consume them from the face of the earth’? Turn from your fierce wrath; change your mind and do not bring disaster on your people.

32:13 Remember Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, your servants, how you swore to them by your own self, saying to them, ‘I will multiply your descendants like the stars of heaven, and all this land that I have promised I will give to your descendants, and they shall inherit it forever.'”

32:14 And the LORD changed his mind about the disaster that he planned to bring on his people.

Noisy Offering – Children of Simpson UMC

The children of Simpson UMC collect the loose offering from the congregation once a month for a special mission.

Here they are receiving buckets from their Sunday School teacher Brenda.  The coins are very loud when tossed into these buckets, the children love it!

The most recent mission was sending money to an orphanage in Japan after the devastating tsunami.

image

 

 

Shichi-Go-San, Blessing of the Children

Shichi-Go-San “Seven-Five-Three” is a traditional festival day in Japan celebrated to mark the growth of children as they turn three, five and seven years of age.  In Japan this festival occurs annually on November 15 or on the nearest weekend.  Parents take their children to a shrine where they pray for the good health and well-being of their children.

At Simpson UMC Shichi-Go-San was celebrated this year on October 5th.  We also call the day “Blessing of the Children”.  We bless all children of the congregation and other children who wish to attend, we thank God for their presence in our lives and for their health and happiness.

imageimageimage

In Japan the children may wear their traditional dress, kimonos for girls and haori jackets and hakama trousers for boys.

At Simpson the girls wore kimonos and the boys happi jackets.  Ann Henderson presided over a blessing for the children.  Ann truly joined in the spirit of the day and wore a kimono provide by Jane Fujioka.

image