Iron Pour Art

 

Here’s how they stop the iron from pouring from the copulas where a continuous supply is being melted.

Iron casting.  Molten iron poured into tiles or molds.

The public was allowed to participate, buying tiles for $10 and creating their own fantastic artwork and sculptures.

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Here’s my friend Mary Lou’s tile mold.   When she gets the finished product cleaned up and polished will share it with you.

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This is from an iron pour she did last year.

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Graphite was painted into the molds,  this prevents the iron from sticking to the tile when it’s poured.

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Here’s another tile.  Day of the Dead theme.

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Filling the tiles with molten iron. After a brief wait tiles are cracked from the still red hot iron pieces which are then dropped into a bucket of water to finish the cooling.

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Here they’re pouring molten iron into some of the molded sculptures .

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Mary Lou and I both had holes in our jackets from this display!

Had a great evening.  Next time I just might buy a tile and create some art!

 

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Iron Casting Performance, Ceramics Raku, and Torch Glass Demonstrations, Arvada Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is Mary Lou’s mold after it was cast in iron during the Iron Pour and Performance at the Arvada Center by the Western Cast Iron Art Alliance.

 

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Molds were available for carving on the spot.

This one is Mary Lou’s before the the iron was poured into it and then placed into a cupola or furnace.

imageHere the iron is being poured into the carved molds.

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There was also on display a ceramic firing technique called Raku and a glass demonstration.

Haley and Matt clowning with the Yak & Yeti, a local restaurant serving cuisine of India, Nepal and Tibet (and awesome brewpub).

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Paint and Vino!

 

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A group of us got together for a painting class with wine. This was our example.

 

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Yikes!  That’s not the wine, that’s the paintbrush glass!

 

image We felt very important assembling our pallets of acrylic paints .

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And off we go ….

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We really were all painting the same picture.

image It was amazing to see how everybody’s paintings went off in different directions.
imageThis one is mine😓😂

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It was great fun!

 

Cherry Creek Arts Festival, Another Talented Artist

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The Cherry Creek Arts Festival here in Denver Colorado is one of my favorite festivals.

This year on July 4th my stepdaughter and I connected with this artist.

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Alex lives in Arizona and we aren’t as close as either of us would like to be.

As a surprise I went back on July 5th and picked out these two sets of earrings.

If we each were buying a pair Alex would have bought the pair that looks like twigs and I would’ve bought the flowers.

This is what we did.  We each keep one earring from each set to wear them together. Then we can think of each other when we are wearing them!

The artist was excited when she heard what we were going to do in to make the earrings even she put the flowers on short wires and the twigs on long wires so they are about the same length when we wear them.

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We will be thinking of each other a lot!

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Cherry Creek Arts Festival Awesome Artist

 

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The Cherry Creek Arts Festival here in Denver Colorado is one of my favorite festivals.

I enjoy connecting with the artists.  This year I was lucky enough to connect with maja and you can see more of her work here maja , http://majadesigns.com

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My stepdaughter Alex was visiting for the week and we are trying to reconnect.   This festival was something we did together as a family when she was much younger.  We went on July 4 to check it out and she also loved this artist.

I went back on July 5 and picked out two sets of earrings.  And this is what we did:

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We each keep one hearing from each set and wear them together. Then we can think of each other when we are wearing them!  Since she lives in Arizona this “brings us together across the miles”.

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The Courageous Art of Blogging

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Every blog I visit is a creative wonderland.

Every one of you is an amazing artist. Sharing your innermost thoughts, feeding my soul!

You invite us into your world with your words, stories, photographs, poems, drawings, painting, crafts and more.   Each of you in your own unique way.

You are brave.

Thank you  for sharing your amazing self!

 

 

 

Fidget Quilts by Sandy and Anna

 

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Sandy and Anna, master quilters, have been busy with a project I suggested to them.

My mom suffered from a type of dementia at the end of her life. The doctor said it wasn’t really Alzheimer’s and I was grateful for that.

She always remembered who I was, and every weekend we worked on a flower arrangement and  a jigsaw puzzle.

She sometimes got confused or forgot things. She and I discussed her memory loss and she knew that she needed to be kept safe for when she did get confused.   She was living in a memory care center with other people that suffered from different kinds of dementia or Alzheimer’s. 

There was a condition that most of the people she lived with suffered from called sundowners. At the end of the day a terrible confusion would spread through the residents.

My mom didn’t usually catch the confusion but it would make her anxious.  She usually went to her room to take a nap or read.  When  sundowner time came, she insisted that I leave as it was just too unsettling to be around during this time.

The anxiety and confusion these poor folks felt each and every day has stayed with me. These quilts are designed to be small, lap sized. All the little items on them  offer a distraction to the confused mind.

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All the amazing textures, buttons and zippers, little pockets are wonderful at sundown.   The quilt on the left here has a plastic sleeve where you can insert a picture, too clever huh?

Thank you Sandy and Anna for all you do this is really going to make a difference  and I know it’s going to help relieve a lot of the anxiety these people suffer from.

It is also shown that using your brain in creative new ways helps keep your memory active so not only are Sandy and Anna doing a wonderful thing for others but their brains are getting the benefit of creating this amazing art!

P.S.   I hope they are also using up some of their quilt stash and scrap materials!

 

Bonsai Living With Me!

 

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This bonsai jade plant came to live with me about a week ago.

The owner was not sure how to take care of it as it was a gift. The poor tree came to me with hard impacted soil in many many dead leaves.

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After just a week it already looks much better cleaning away the dead leaves and trimming off some overgrowth.

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I didn’t think the poor little companion bush was going to make it but it looks like he is going to pull through. There are signs that there was once two bushes and now only one is left.   It also appears there was some kind of moss on a portion of the hill and I’m hoping that it will come back too.

Bonsai Display From Hina Matsuri Festival

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Bonsai, living art displayed at the Hina Matsuri Festival.   Do you feel the cold wind sweeping across this tree?  Pulling it to one side day after day as it attempts to reach to the sky.

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These plants growing in harmony with driftwood and rocks.

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The display on the right is a grove of trees.  The roots are exposed in the neagiri style.  Perhaps they were caught in a flood or tsunami which washed the soil away and left the roots uncovered and only protected by nature.

 

Kokeshi Dolls at Hina Matsuri Festival

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Kokeshi dolls originated as handmade wooden dolls with round limbless bodies and round heads.  The kokeshi doll may initially have had a spiritual significance.  Perhaps given as a gift to watch over a child as the child grew and representing the child’s guardian, keeper of the child’s soul or the giver’s wish for a healthy child.

Each doll was hand painted and no two faces where alike giving each doll an individual personality.  Possibly the giver carefully picked a doll representing a wish for the child such as to be creative and happy or industrious and serious.

The designs and patterns painted on the bodies were developed and passed down through the generations and provide clues as to the area where a particular doll was made.

Creative kokeshi dolls are a more modern doll and were first made after WWII.  Although they retain the limbless kokeshi characteristic, other features of these dolls are distinctly different such as more shapely bodies.  Creative kokeshi are designed by the individual artist and have modern charms unique to that artist.

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Whether a traditional or creative kokeshi doll the most striking characteristic is still the obvious pursuit of simple beauty.