Jason the Awesome Doll Interpreter at the 2016 Hina Matsuri Festival

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Jason worked both Saturday and Sunday as a doll interpreter in the doll room at our annual Hina Matsuri Festival.

He actually didn’t finish his homework Saturday night but his mom realized that we really needed his help and allowed him to come back to teach the public about the main doll display Sunday.

He is now our expert on the traditional girl’s Hina Matsuri seven tier doll display.

Next year his mom is going to help us with finding facts about the history of the samurai armor, weapons and protective clothing.

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Hope you can join us next year for our 49th Annual Hina Matsuri Festival celebration.  Dolls, Japanese food, Ikebana, Bonsai, Tea Ceremony, Martial Arts, Japanese music on traditional instruments, dance, and Taiko drumming just to name a bit of the program.

And Jason and I should have some interesting stuff to share with you!

Jason My Co-worker at Hina Matsuri Festival

imageMeet Jason.  We worked the doll room together today at our Hinamatsuri Festival.

Jason is wearing a boy’s kimono.  A gift from his Aunt and Uncle who live in Japan.

The square fabric tucked into his obi and tied with white rope represents a knife.  He promised he didn’t really have a knife, just a piece of cardboard.
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The back of the Kimono was amazing.  This is a formal Kimono, not for casual wear.  Perfect for a special festival!

Jason will be back tomorrow teaching people about the dolls, if he gets his homework done!

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Yummy musubi and bento box lunches available while they last.

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This weekend at the 2016 Hina Matsuri Festival Homemade Manju

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The ladies have been busy cooking for the festival. Homemade manju, spam musubi and chicken  teriyaki bento boxes each day while they last.

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The Festival is open to the public and free of charge.

Some information on dolls displayed:  Kokeshi DollsOtafuku-SanPictures from Past Hina Matsuri Festivals

Also on display are Bonsai (miniature plants and trees) Bonsai at Hina Matsuri Festival and Ikebana (flower arranging) Ikebana at Hina Matsuri Festival

On the stage: Taiko Drums, Martial Arts and variety of music.  Taiko with Toni 2015 Hina Matsuri Festival

Other interesting displays are the Kimonos Wedding Kimono, Gaman Art from Internment Camp The Art of Gaman in Internment Camps, a Display at Hina Matsuri Festival

Hope you can join us!

 

2016 Hina Matsuri Festival at Simpson

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Doll’s Day or Girls’ Day.  In Japan it is held every March 3rd.  At Simpson our Festival is held the first full weekend of every March, this year March 5th and 6th.

The Festival is open to the public and free of charge.

The families in the Japanese community display their amazing dolls, many of which have been in their families for generations.  Past posts on dolls:  Kokeshi DollsOtafuku-SanPictures from Past Hina Matsuri Festivals

Also on display are Bonsai (miniature plants and trees) Bonsai at Hina Matsuri Festival and Ikebana (flower arranging) Ikebana at Hina Matsuri Festival.  Very welcome as we wait for spring to finally replace winter.

The ladies prepare Bento Boxes for lunch each day which are extremely popular and are sold out quickly.

A constant parade of activity on the stage in the gymnasium including Taiko Drums, Martial Arts and variety of music.  Taiko with Toni 2015 Hina Matsuri Festival

Other interesting displays are the Kimonos Wedding Kimono, Gaman Art from Internment Camp The Art of Gaman in Internment Camps, a Display at Hina Matsuri Festival

Hope you can join us!

 

EnduraPet My Favorite Vendor at 2016 Denver Dog Show

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This year I was pleased to see EnduraPet, my favorite dog supplement provider, had returned to the 2016 Denver Dog Show.

I have been using EnduraPet for about six years now and have never been disappointed with results.

Here is a post I did about how their Mobility Plus+ changed my ageing German Shepherd’s life Mobility Plus+

The quality of their products continues to impress me.  I have a rescue dog suffering from Addison’s Disease.  He is quite nervous during stormy weather such as thunder and extreme wind.  He is also no so happy with fireworks.  I have been using the Calming Plus+ product for about three years and find it does just that, calms poor Roscoe’s nerves.  The wind, thunder and loud fireworks still bother him; but, with the help of Calming Plus+, he is able to settle down and wait out the event.

Rommy, Roscoe and Monty
Rommy, Roscoe and Monty

 

For more info go here to www.EnduraPet.com

Thank you Alex, Knit and Crochet for Charity update.

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Thank you Alex for sending these awesome squares for the prayer blankets.

These patterns are amazing!

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Our church is collecting 10 inch squares from knitters and crocheters to sew into prayer blankets.  We are thrilled to have some travel all the way from Arizona to add to our collection!

 

Today’s Haiku – Theodora Guest Blogger

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Hi, my name is Theodora.

I am a guest blogger here on sanseilife.

My brother Teddy lives in a Jeep but I live in a house.

Teddy living in a Jeep
Teddy living in a Jeep

We both write Haiku.

Here is one on circumstances:

  • we are both alone
  • longing for gentle touch
  • as someone’s treasure

    Theodora, Teddy's sister
    Theodora, Teddy’s sister

Masami Nonaka, a Child’s Memories of WWII Internment Camp Amachi, Part Three

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The Nonaka family had arrived at Camp Amache, the internment camp near Granada, Colorado. Their home for the next 3 years.

Each family was assigned a number and a name badge which the Nonaka family were required to wear on their journey to Camp Amache.

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There were 349 barracks located in 30 blocks, 12 barracks per block.  The Nonaka family was given one  of the four rooms located in each barrack.   Their room was  approximately 20’×24′  which housed Mas, his older brother and sister, and his mother and father.  Each Nonaka was given an Army bed or cot, one blanket and one straw mattress.  The Nanakas were also given a pot bellied coal stove for heat and one light bulb.

There were no toilets only an out house.  Eventually there was a latrine which also contained group showers and community laundry room.  The men’s and women’s  areas were separate but that was the extent of the privacy.

There was one large building assigned as a mess hall. The internees could not all be fed at one time so they ate in shifts.  The internees ate quickly from their tin trays to make room for the next group of people to get their meal.

There were two or three meatless days a week. Often the meals were mutton or liver, unfamiliar to the internees, with no attempt to try to make the strong flavors more tasty.

Children and adults learned to stand in line to eat and use the bathroom, it was just a daily occurrence for them.

The adults attempted to shield the children, keeping busy and making routines.  Mas remembers playing with the other boys and marbles were a favorite.

 

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Three years to go!

To be continued.

Today’s Haiku – Teddy Guest Blogger

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Hi, my name is Teddy.

I am a guest blogger here on sanseilife.

I am alone in this Jeep in Arvada, Colorado and one of the things I do to amuse myself is write Haiku.

Here is one on last night’s crazy wind:

 

  • the raging wind blows
  • rocking my jeep in fury
  • i am not afraid