Jason My Co-worker at Hina Matsuri Festival

imageMeet Jason.  We worked the doll room together today at our Hinamatsuri Festival.

Jason is wearing a boy’s kimono.  A gift from his Aunt and Uncle who live in Japan.

The square fabric tucked into his obi and tied with white rope represents a knife.  He promised he didn’t really have a knife, just a piece of cardboard.
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The back of the Kimono was amazing.  This is a formal Kimono, not for casual wear.  Perfect for a special festival!

Jason will be back tomorrow teaching people about the dolls, if he gets his homework done!

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Yummy musubi and bento box lunches available while they last.

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This weekend at the 2016 Hina Matsuri Festival Homemade Manju

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The ladies have been busy cooking for the festival. Homemade manju, spam musubi and chicken  teriyaki bento boxes each day while they last.

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The Festival is open to the public and free of charge.

Some information on dolls displayed:  Kokeshi DollsOtafuku-SanPictures from Past Hina Matsuri Festivals

Also on display are Bonsai (miniature plants and trees) Bonsai at Hina Matsuri Festival and Ikebana (flower arranging) Ikebana at Hina Matsuri Festival

On the stage: Taiko Drums, Martial Arts and variety of music.  Taiko with Toni 2015 Hina Matsuri Festival

Other interesting displays are the Kimonos Wedding Kimono, Gaman Art from Internment Camp The Art of Gaman in Internment Camps, a Display at Hina Matsuri Festival

Hope you can join us!

 

2016 Hina Matsuri Festival at Simpson

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Doll’s Day or Girls’ Day.  In Japan it is held every March 3rd.  At Simpson our Festival is held the first full weekend of every March, this year March 5th and 6th.

The Festival is open to the public and free of charge.

The families in the Japanese community display their amazing dolls, many of which have been in their families for generations.  Past posts on dolls:  Kokeshi DollsOtafuku-SanPictures from Past Hina Matsuri Festivals

Also on display are Bonsai (miniature plants and trees) Bonsai at Hina Matsuri Festival and Ikebana (flower arranging) Ikebana at Hina Matsuri Festival.  Very welcome as we wait for spring to finally replace winter.

The ladies prepare Bento Boxes for lunch each day which are extremely popular and are sold out quickly.

A constant parade of activity on the stage in the gymnasium including Taiko Drums, Martial Arts and variety of music.  Taiko with Toni 2015 Hina Matsuri Festival

Other interesting displays are the Kimonos Wedding Kimono, Gaman Art from Internment Camp The Art of Gaman in Internment Camps, a Display at Hina Matsuri Festival

Hope you can join us!

 

Bonsai Display From Hina Matsuri Festival

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Bonsai, living art displayed at the Hina Matsuri Festival.   Do you feel the cold wind sweeping across this tree?  Pulling it to one side day after day as it attempts to reach to the sky.

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These plants growing in harmony with driftwood and rocks.

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The display on the right is a grove of trees.  The roots are exposed in the neagiri style.  Perhaps they were caught in a flood or tsunami which washed the soil away and left the roots uncovered and only protected by nature.

 

Ikebana displays from Hina Matsuri Festival

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The traditional Japanese home will have a small alcove where seasonal art is displayed.

Ikebana, the art of observing nature is an example of treasured seasonal art.  The ikebana arrangement may be used in harmony with other works of art or alone.

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Amazingly these different angles reveal totally different aspects of the same story.

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The simple flower arrangement celebrates the beauty of subtraction.  Empty spaces reveal their secrets.

 

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Does the mood of the arrangement begin with the container?  The color, the shape, the texture.  Or is it the relationship between the container, and each flower, leaf, branch and other elements of the arrangement that express the story of the artist?

The art of ikebana requires the artist to use all five senses.  Finding beauty and balance in the simple and bringing every day life into appreciation.

 

Taiko with Toni 2015 Hina Matsuri Festival opening set and introduction

 

 

Always a favorite at Denver Festivals, Taiko With Toni performed at the recent Hina Matsuri Festival.

I am excited as I have just started studying with this group.  Thank goodness I am the amateur videographer and won’t be performing!

Kokeshi Dolls at Hina Matsuri Festival

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Kokeshi dolls originated as handmade wooden dolls with round limbless bodies and round heads.  The kokeshi doll may initially have had a spiritual significance.  Perhaps given as a gift to watch over a child as the child grew and representing the child’s guardian, keeper of the child’s soul or the giver’s wish for a healthy child.

Each doll was hand painted and no two faces where alike giving each doll an individual personality.  Possibly the giver carefully picked a doll representing a wish for the child such as to be creative and happy or industrious and serious.

The designs and patterns painted on the bodies were developed and passed down through the generations and provide clues as to the area where a particular doll was made.

Creative kokeshi dolls are a more modern doll and were first made after WWII.  Although they retain the limbless kokeshi characteristic, other features of these dolls are distinctly different such as more shapely bodies.  Creative kokeshi are designed by the individual artist and have modern charms unique to that artist.

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Whether a traditional or creative kokeshi doll the most striking characteristic is still the obvious pursuit of simple beauty.