Iron Pour Art

 

Here’s how they stop the iron from pouring from the copulas where a continuous supply is being melted.

Iron casting.  Molten iron poured into tiles or molds.

The public was allowed to participate, buying tiles for $10 and creating their own fantastic artwork and sculptures.

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Here’s my friend Mary Lou’s tile mold.   When she gets the finished product cleaned up and polished will share it with you.

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This is from an iron pour she did last year.

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Graphite was painted into the molds,  this prevents the iron from sticking to the tile when it’s poured.

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Here’s another tile.  Day of the Dead theme.

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Filling the tiles with molten iron. After a brief wait tiles are cracked from the still red hot iron pieces which are then dropped into a bucket of water to finish the cooling.

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Here they’re pouring molten iron into some of the molded sculptures .

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Mary Lou and I both had holes in our jackets from this display!

Had a great evening.  Next time I just might buy a tile and create some art!

 

Iron Casting Performance, Ceramics Raku, and Torch Glass Demonstrations, Arvada Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is Mary Lou’s mold after it was cast in iron during the Iron Pour and Performance at the Arvada Center by the Western Cast Iron Art Alliance.

 

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Molds were available for carving on the spot.

This one is Mary Lou’s before the the iron was poured into it and then placed into a cupola or furnace.

imageHere the iron is being poured into the carved molds.

imageQuite a crowd!

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There was also on display a ceramic firing technique called Raku and a glass demonstration.

Haley and Matt clowning with the Yak & Yeti, a local restaurant serving cuisine of India, Nepal and Tibet (and awesome brewpub).

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